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The National Blue Trail in Balaton-felvidék Region
(Last revision and update: 15th January 2017)


Map details about the route of the Blue Trail in this region:


Maps are the property of the Cartographia map company! All right reserved! Don't copy the map details and don't share them! Use it only for private purposes, please!
Maps are uploaded from Blue Trail guide 2002 edition. I update the map details together with the description, but only the route of the Blue Trail! The routes of other hiker trails are not maintained in the maps, so these maps don't contain the hiking trails were painted after 2002! The route of the Blue Trail is marked with red “K” characters.

You can find the detailed explanation of the Hungarian hikers paths' marks is in this chapter.



The route-altitude profile of the National Blue Trail in this region

This diagram was made on basis of my GPS survey between 2010 and 2012. It can deviate a little bit from the official lenght and ascent/descent data of the appropriate section. Its reason could be many things: for example measuring inaccuracy or the change of the route. In spite of this fact these diagrams could give a good summary about the route of the Blue Trail. Click on the picture to open the route-altitude diagram of the whole region!

The places written with bold characters in the text show the marked places in the route-altitude diagram. The small stamp icons show the stamping places.



Third section: From Sümeg railway station until Keszthely railway station

Castle of Sümeg - Taken from the rail crossing

After stamping at the railway station (Sümeg, vasútállomás), where the metal box of the Blue Trail's stamp is located on a wooden pillar at the platform side of the building, we begin our next hike through the hilly country of the Balaton-felvidék (Highland of Balaton). This section will be a little bit more interested and varied, than the wide plain of Kisalföld, we will visit on this walking tour many ruined forts and castles, the extinct volcanoes of the Tapolcai-medence (Basin of Tapolca) and of course the Balaton Lake.

When we leave the railway station of Sümeg, we continue the walk on the streets of the town. First we go along the straight Darnai Kálmán utca (Darnai Kálmán Street). It is a very interesting place of the net of marked Hungarian hiking paths, because the four main signs – the blue strip, the red strip, the green strip and the yellow strip signs go together on this short section – they are painted onto the concrete lamp posts!

The railway station of Sümeg

We walk until the end of this road and turn onto the Lukonich Gábor utca (Lukonich Gábor Street). We pass the small Calvinistic-evangelistic church and reach the main street of the town. The painted blue marks lead us farther on the Kossuth Lajos utca (Kossuth Lajos Street) and reach the Flórián tér (Flórián Square), the main square of the town soon. The bus station (Sümeg, buszpályaudvar) is located on the middle of the square and the castle is visible very well from this place, as well. The Blue Trail goes straight on the main road, but I recommend you to spend some time in the town and visit its important sights.

The most well-known sight is the castle or rather fortress among them, of course. If we climb onto the high Castle Hill on the steep rising access road of the fort, we can visit the ruins of the medieval fortress and admire the beautiful panorama, which opens from the walls. The castle was built in the 13th century, after the Tartar invasion, and it was an important fortress in the 16th and 17th century, against the Turkey troops. The Turks wasn’t able to capture this fort although they tried it many times, but the fortress couldn’t avoid its fate, the Austrian troops demolished it after the defeated freedom war in year 1711.

Hard climb to the gate tower of the fortress

If the weather is clean enough, we can see the ridge of the far Kőszegi-hegység (Kőszeg Mountains) with the peak of Írott-kő from the walls in northwestern direction beyond the wide plain of Kisalföld, where we hiked in the past few days. In the opposite direction appear the extinct volcanoes of the Tapolcai-medence (Basin of Tapolca). We can see only the flat tops of the Szent György-hegy (Szent György Hill) and the Badacsony, because the closer, but lower hills partly cover them.

Other sights are the Bishop’s palace in the town at the foot of the Castle Hill, the frescos of the Roman Catholic church, painted by Maulbertsch and the horse riding centre on the eastern side of the Castle Hill. If we have good luck, we can see the Várjátékok (Castle Shows), where amateur actors recall the medieval history of the town and the castle.

Panorama towards Sümeg and the extinct volcanoes of Basin of Tapoca from the wall of the fortress

If we decide to leave this nice Hungarian town, we hike further from the Flórián tér (Flórián Square) along the wide and straight József Attila utca (József Attila Street), finally we reach the border of the town and the main road number 84. Our road leads into the main road, but there is a dirt road on the right side of the busy highway, we continue our hike on it. We pass the last plants of the town, and slowly climb a little hillock.

After some minutes we turn onto a narrow asphalt road, which branch off from the motorway. This road leads through a fence into a yard (Mogyorósi-domb, geológiai bemutatóhely). There is a camp inside and a small geological excavation. Here we can study the site of an old, Palaeolithic flint stones mine, because the Jurassic rocks are found here close to the surface soil. This flint stone mine was used by the prehistoric people living here in this neighborhood.

A last glance towards the plain of the Kisalföld

We walk only a few steps on the narrow asphalt road, after that turn left onto a well-trodden dirt road and cross the high voltage power lines. The road descends back onto the plain, we can see the railway line below us. Later the dirt road bends beside the rails and cross them later. After a few minutes we reach the railway station named “Sümegi bazaltbánya vasútállomás” (Basalt Mine of Sümeg). The marked trail passes the first houses, and in front of the main building of the station turns right, onto another dirt road. We continue our hike across the fields and get to the branching of asphalt roads soon.

We can see the fortress at the end of the narrow asphalt road

We turn left onto a narrow, worn asphalt road, and continue the hike on it. The road leads beside big clearcuts and we reach the forest after an about 10 minutes long walk. If we turn back here, we will see the Castle Hill of Sümeg exactly at the end of this road! We continue the walk in the shady forest, later the road begins to climb, first very mildly, but later it will be more and more steeper. After the bend of the road we get to the forester’s lodge of Sarvaly (Sarvaly erdészház, pecsételőhely). The house stands on the left side of the road, we can find the small steel box of the Blue Trail’s stamp on the fence, beside the gate.

After stamping we continue the hike on the road along a nice horse chestnut alley. The Sarvaly-forrás (Sarvaly Spring) and the resting place are located beside our way on a small clearing. It is accessible on a short path beginning at a painted cross on the right side of the road. After a short rest we go on along the narrow asphalt road, after a few bends it climbs onto a low col. Later the asphalt surface of the road finishes, and two gravel roads start here. We choose the left-hand road, it leads on the edge of the old forest and a weedy field, a nice view opens right across the fields towards the Tátika-hegy (Tátika Hill). Later we will climb it.

Hard climb in the mountainside

After a ten minutes long walk we turn right from the gravel road onto a narrow wheel track (Letérés a földútról a romos erdészháznál), which leads straight in western direction through the forest. After a while we reach the other gravel road, which started right from the branching, here we turn left and continue the hike on it. We have to look for the turn-off very carefully after about 400 steps, because it is almost invisible on the right side of the gravel road! If we find the narrow track, we turn onto it and after a few steps we reach a cut-line ascending straight on the hill. We climb about 300 steps in it, and turn left.

The hard climb finishes here, the track keeps its altitude in the mountainside. After a while the path bends right, and the climb begins again in a small valley towards the top. This is a very neglected section of the route, fallen trees and high weed obstruct the walk in the forest! Later the valley becomes narrower, and the path leaves it. We reach here a plateau in the mountainside, and notice the small Fekete-tó (Black Lake) among the trees. The narrow and neglected trail meanders among the trees in the high undergrowth, we have to fight for every steps! Finally, after a quarter hour long combat in the jungle we get to a well trodden dirt road in the forest (Kék rom jelzés Tátika várához). The blue strip signs of the Blue Trail turn left here, but if we go in the opposite direction on the dirt road following the blue ruins marks, after a ten minutes long climb we reach the ruins of Castle of Tátika on the top of the mountain.

The ruined Castle of Tátika

The castle was built, similar to other Hungarian castles, in the 13th century, after the Tartar invasion. The core of it was a dwelling tower and other buildings were connected to it. The owners of the castle changed often in the 14th and 15th century, it was many times the property of the king. The Turkey troops occupied and demolished it in 1589 and it was never reconstructed. The castle was mentioned already as ruins in the 18th century. Only the northern walls stand at present with some other ruins, but its partial reconstruction began some year ago. The panorama is beautiful from the ruins towards Sümeg and Zalaszántó village.

We can see Castle of Sümeg in the distance

If we decide to leave the ruins, we will reach the asphalt road leading towards Zalaszántó on the dirt road in a half an hour. We turn onto the main road and walk about 500 steps in northern direction, meanwhile pass the buildinds of Hidegkúti-major, until the beginning of the field on the left side. We jump over the roadside ditch here and continue the hike at the edge of the grassy field beside the trees. A dirt road arrives from right later, we follow it through the fields until the corner of the forest! The road turns into the forest here and goes farther in southwestern direction. After a kilometer long walk on this neglected road reach the edge of the forest again, the wheel tracks turn out from the forest beside the outermost trees and run at the border of the cultivated area. Later we cross the abandoned yard of an old stone quarry, and continue our hike on its short access road.

This is the largest stupa in Europe

In the junction of well trodden dirt roads we go on straight, a big information board shows the direction and the distance towards the Stupa. Generally there is a big traffic on the road leading to the Stupa, because the visitors come by cars, only a few pilgrims come on foot. The Stupa (Letérés a Sztúpához) stands on the 316 meter tall top of the hill, on a grassy clearing. It is Europe’s largest stupa, 30 meter tall and 24 meter wide. The Stupa contains the teaching and relics of Buddha, together with a “tree of life”. His Holiness, the 14th Dalai Lama consecrated the Stupa on 17th June 1993.

The route of the Blue Trail turns left before the clearing of the Stupa onto a well trodden dirt road leading towards Zalaszántó village. After the forest we reach the first houses and vineyards of the settlement, the road get an asphalt surface here. The street descends gently among the gardens and houses, passes by a chapel (there is a nice panorama to the village and the hills from the door of the small church), later we turn left, and the narrow road sinks into a shady ditch. We reach the houses of Zalaszántó after a ten minutes long walk at the other end of the small valley. The Ádám utca (Ádám street) sinks till the bottom of the small valley and a brook bends beside the street. The marked route crosses the brook on a pedestrian bridge, the path run beside the fence of the former Kotsi water mill (it is now a museum) and we reach the main street in a few minutes. We turn onto this asphalt road, and walk on its slope towards south. We can stamp either at the Tátika pub (98 Fő utca, Zalaszántó, the box of the stamp is located in window) or at the grocery (12 Fő utca Zalaszántó, the box of the stamp is equipped onto the fence of the terrace). After stamping we continue the hike.

The Romanesque-gothic catholic church of Zalaszántó

Zalaszántó was first mentioned in documents in 1236, in that time its Catholic church already stood, but it was renovated many times during the centuries. So the church has a Romanesque nave but a gothic tower and apse. The wooden sculptures were made in the 17th century. The church was partly destroyed in the Turkey times, but it was fully renovated. The gothic windows of the church are good visible from the main street of the village. Other sights in the village are the Kotsi-malom (Kotsy water mill), which is a museum at present and the small chapel beside the main road, which was built in 1441 in honour of the Immaculate Conception. There is a good camping beyond the northern border of the settlement beside the road. Its name is Szt. Vendel Camping.

The Kotsi-malom in Zalaszántó

We pass the Catholic church of the settlement (Zalaszántó, római ketolikus templom) and turn left at the “T” junction onto the Zsidi utca and leave the settlement. The Blue Trail turn down from this asphalt road after about 1000 steps onto dirt road crossing a narrow forest belt. We reach the corner of a big cultivated area, the wheel track runs at the western edge of the field, our heading is about southeast. As we walk on the field we can see the white walls of Castle of Rezi on the peak of the Meleg-hegy Mountain exactly in front of us. Later we will climb this forest covered hill and visit the panorama opening from the ruined fort.

The wheel tracks follow the edge of the field and we reach its southwestern corner soon. We have to look for that narrow path, which starts about here and cross the jungle of the valley. It is a serious combat against the creepers and the high undergrowth, especially summertime. Finally the hardly visible trail reaches the Nagy-Séd Brook on the bottom of the valley. We have to cross the water at a small ford, some branches lie between the coasts, we can use them at the passage. The path climbs onto a worn asphalt road at the southern coast of the brook. We turn towards west on this road and reach the next cossing after some dozen steps.

At the Nagy-Séd Brook

The route of the Blue Trail turns left here, into the old forest and a hard climb begins here onto the Meleg-hegy. The dirt road ascends always harder and harder, we reach the col after a half an hour long, exhausting mountaineering. The route of Blue Trail flips on the col and begins to descend on the other side, but the road marked with blue ruins starts here towards the ruins of Castle of Rezi. If we decide visiting the ruins, we can get to it with a quarter hour long walk. A really beautiful panorama opens from the walls towards the wide valley of Zalaszántó village and the surrounding hills. Even the Stupa and the Castle of Tátika are visible from that place!

Panorama from the ruins of Castle of Rezi

We walk back onto the col, and continue the hike again onto the dirt road marked with blue strip signs. We sink for some minutes in the forest, later we reach the wide, cultivated field of Cservári-dűlő. We cross this area, and turn right at a “T” junction of dirt roads. We reach Rezi village after some minutes on this road. An asphalt road begins at the outermost houses of the settlement, it leads us until the centre of the village, during this walk we pass by the Laky Demeter tourist house. We can stamp into our booklets in the pub. The box of the stamp is equipped on the wall beside the door of the washroom (Rezi, letérés a pecsételőhelyhez).

The Laky Demeter tourist house in Rezi

After stamping we go on along the main road and after the last houses reach the fields. We may think here, we left the village, but after a short walk we reach the new estate of Rezi. The Blue Trail doesn't cross this estate, but turns right onto the first street at a painted wayside stone cross. This narrow asphalt road leaves the houses and meanders among the homesteads and vineyards. After a while we reach the forest, but before the road enters in the wood, we turn right, onto a path. We enter the forest on this path, which descends from the hill on the right side of a small glen.

The graves of two outlaws. The Hungarian name of these outlaws were “betyár”.

After a while we reach again the vineyards at the far side of the forest, we turn onto a gravel road and get to the Gyöngyösi csárda on it. A big weeping willow stands on the right side of the gravel road about fifty meters from its finish. If we step closer to the tree, we will notice two graves at the foot of the weeping willow: graves of two outlaws, Vak Illés and Kökes Pista. They were captured and executed at this place in 1860.

Blue Trail's stamping place beside the “csárda”

The “csárda” was a characteristic part of the old Hungarian roads. They were restaurant, pub and accommodation for the people, who wandered on the long dirt roads of the country. Usually the csárda was a post station, as well. The Gyöngyösi csárda was built in 1728, and it stands in its original form beside the busy road halfway between Balaton Lake and Sümeg. The small steel box of the Blue Trail’s stamp is located on a lamp post between the fence of the csárda and the main road. You can find another stamp in front of the csárda, at the shelter of the bus stop.

After the stamping procedure we continue our hike beside the wide and straight asphalt road in northwestern direction. We cross the Gyöngyös-patak (Gyöngyös Brook) on a bridge and after a kilometer long walk we reach a white stone cross on the left side of the road. A well trodden dirt road starts here, we turn onto it. We walk towards south now and after some minutes we notice the building of Gyöngyösi csárda again. The dirt road crosses the fields, later it gets to the edge of the forest. It runs for a while beside the trees, later it enters the wood. We have to look for the branching path after about two kilometer long walk. A narrow trail starts on the right side of the dirt road and it begins to climb in the side of the hill.

The Romanesque church of the former Egregy village

After a few steps we reach the border of a former clear-cut, we climb beside the old trees towards the ridge. A beautiful panorama opens from the upper edge of the clear-cut towards the wide valley of the Gyöngyös-patak and the surrounding hills. The painted blue strip marks lead us on wheel tracks, which cross the forest and after a quarter hour long walk we reach the cultivated fields of the wide ridge. We turn left onto a well trodden dirt road and a slope begins back in the valley. After a few minutes we leave the forest, get to the first vineyards and appears the old, Romanesque church in the hillside (Egregy, Árpád-kori templom).

The small church stands beside our route, in the centre of a small cemetery. It was built in the first half of the 13th century and it survived the long Turk occupation without any damage. The church is generally open, so we can visit its painted wall, which was made in the 18th century. From the church we can see the whole valley of Gyöngyös-patak, as well.

View from the church to the valley

We continue our hike on a narrow asphalt road among the long row of restaurants and pubs. The Highland of Balaton is well-known from its wines, the pubs offer local wines mainly. It is worth visiting one of them and rest some minutes on its shady terrace! Generally they are opened only in the afternoon and evening, before noon they are closed!

After the restaurants and pubs the asphalt road descends into Hévíz town and we continue the walk on the long Zrínyi Miklós utca (Zrínyi Miklós Street) towards the downtown. After a while we reach the centre of the settlement among nice guesthouses and dwelling houses. We pass the modern Catholic church, and turn onto the wide Széchenyi utca. We descend further, till the shady walking road named Rákóczi utca, which leads until the lake bath of the town. The main gate of the bath opens on a small square, here is located the terminal of the intersettlement busses, as well. We can find the box of the Blue Trail’s stamp in the waiting room of the terminal, on the wall (Hévíz, letérés az autóbusz pályaudvarhoz).

The main gate of the Lake Bath

If we have enough time, it is worth visiting the lake and the bath. The ticket office is located beside the main gate, they offer half-day ticket as well. If we enter the gate, we can reach the lake, which is the largest thermal lake in Europe, through a nice park. The water is reputed to have curative effects, and there is a thriving health tourism industry in the neighborhood. The curative effect of the lake was probably known to the ancient Romans. Coins were found in the lake in the early 1980s, they also support this supposition. Discoveries from the age of Migration suggest that the migrant German and Slavic population used the lake as well. Written sources are more than 400 years old, they originated from the age of the Turkish invasion.

The buildings of the spa stand on long pine poles in the water of the lake. They are connected with bridges to the shore of the lake. The lake is located in the park, the bather people can find place on the grassy clearings beside the lake. The very much sophisticated complex balneotherapy of Hévíz and the spa are parts of the world's cultural heritage.

The buildings of the bath stand partly in the water

The route of the Blue Tail goes around the fenced park of the Lake Bath on a promenade and reach the busy Ady Endre utca (Ady Endre Street). We walk some hundred steps on its sidewalk beside the fence of the spa until the next crosswalk, where we turn left and cross the asphalt road. We walk through a car park, and turn onto the cycle road. This nice, paved, later with asphalt covered cycling road and promenade connects the two towns, Hévíz and Keszhely to each other. We can reach Keszhely in an hour through forests and tussocky fields.

Cycle road between Hévíz and Keszthely

The straight cycle road joins into the busy Hévízi út at the border of Keszthely, we go farther on its sidewalk. After some minutes we reach a big junction, here we turn right, towards south. As we walk on the wide Soproni utca (Soproni Street), the Baroque gate of the park of the Festetics palace appears in front of us. The painted blue strip marks lead us until the gate (Keszthely, Festetics kastély északi kapuja), but don't enter the park, the route of the Blue Trail goesaround the fenced garden. I think it is worth visiting the beautiful garden and the Baroque park, which is among the biggest ones in Hungary!

Christopher Festetics began the construction of the Festetics Palace in 1745. The two-storey, U-shaped, 34-room Baroque palace was rebuilt several times in the 18th and 19th centuries. Between 1769 and 1770 Paul Festetics III, Christopher’s son had the building reconstructed. The wings were enlarged while the facades remained unaltered. His son, George Festetics I, started the next major reconstruction in 1792. He added the southern library wing to the palace.

The Festetics palace in Keszthely

Between 1883 and 1887 Tassilo Festetics II had the northern wing demolished and a new wing built which was joined to the old one by a turreted central part. Thus, he almost doubled the size of the palace. The building was covered with a mansard roof, and fitted with central heating and plumbing. After the modification of the facades and the interiors, especially the staircases, the palace acquired its present form.

The building is surrounded by a nature reserve park. The sights in the park include trees that are hundreds of years old, colourful flowerbeds, fountains, statues – among them the full-figure bronze statue of George Festetics I –, the garden pond and the fountain decorated with lions. The palm house and the former coach house with the coach exhibition can be found in the park, while the new building of the hunting exhibition and the historical model railway exhibition is opposite the back gate of the park. (Source of the text about the palace: The official website of the castle)

In the naturalistic landscape park of the palace

As we reach the other gate of the park, we continue our walk on the streets of the town and get to the Fő tér (Main Square) on the wide pedestrian precinct named Kossuth Lajos. Beside the City Hall, a theater and a high school the Magyarok Nagyasszonya templom (Church named Our Lady of Hungary) stands here. The church was build in 1386, but its tower much more younger, it was build only in 1878 in the same style. The blue strip marks turn left here and leave the Main Square on narrow, meandering streets. We walk along the Jókai utca (Jókai Street), Móricz Zsigmond utca (Móricz Zsigmond Street), Helikon utca (Helikon Street) route, and reach after some minutes the Helikon Park. We cross it on a wide promenade among plane trees and reach the busy Kazinczy Ferenc utca (Kazinczy Ferenc Street) at the another edge of the park (Keszthely, letérés a vasútállomáshoz).

The marks of the Blue Trail turn left here, but we have to turn right, if we want to stamp into our booklets. The building of the railway station is located in 500 step distance in this direction. The Vén Bakter Pub stands in front of the building of the station, beside the terminal of busses. The box of the Blue Trail's stamp is equipped on the wall in the pub. If the pub is closed, we can ask for stamp at the ticket office of the railway station, or everywhere in the town in shops or museums.


Fourth section: from Keszthely railway station until Tapolca railway station

After stamping we go back to the Helikon park, where the blue strip marks of the Blue Trail arrive on the promenade. We have to walk farther on the sidewalk of the Kazinczy Ferenc utca, but we are closest to the Balaton Lake here. If we cross the road and the railway here, we will reach the lakeside promenade in some minutes. It is worth taking a short walk on the coast, visit the port of passenger ships and feed the swans of the lake. After this short detour we can go back to the track of the Blue Trail.

The painted blue strip marks lead us on the sidewalk of the Kazinczy Ferenc utca, but we don't have any sight onto the lake. This town is very busy in summertime, holiday people walk on the streets, go shopping or to the strand, the streets are crowded with cars and busses. But Keszthely and the other settlements beside the lake are deserted in other seasons, they sleep their winter dream. We walk on the long and straight sidewalk of the Kazinczy Ferenc utca, later on its continuation, on the Apát utca and Toldi Miklós utca (Apát Street and Toldi Miklós Street) finally after a while we get to the end of the settlement, the edge of a grassy meadow. We walk until the farther side of the field and turn left onto the Balaton utca (Balaton Street) at the border of the next settlement, Gyenesdiás village. We go on at the edge of the meadow on the narrow asphalt strip of cycling road till the roundabout of the busy main road number 71 (Gyenesdiás, körforgalom a 71-es úton). We cross it, and if we are tired, we can rest some minutes at the wooden benches and desks of the hiker's resting place in the noise and gasolin vapors :-).

The hills of the Keszthelyi-hegység towers behind the houses of Gyenesdiás village

We continue the hike in eastern direction from the roundabout on the sidewalk of the busy Kossuth Lajos utca, pass by the wooden sculpture of Attila (he was the leader of the Huns) and after about 400 steps turn left at the junction of roads. We walk along quiet the Hunyadi utca (Hunyadi Street), pass the cemetery and begin to climb among the hills. At the end of the asphalt road and the settlement we go on straight and step into the forest on a well trodden dirt road. The climb will be harder, pass by a quarry in the pine forest, and after some minutes we get to the wide clearing of Nagy-mező (it means Big Meadow). We can see the nice resting place situated in the shade of big pine trees, but we can take a short detour from here to the top of the Varsás-hegy (Varsás Hill) on the steep climbing path of blue triangle marks. The climb is only five minutes long, but there is a beautiful panorama towards the Balaton and the surrounding hills from the top level of the Festetics lookout tower! If we come back from the tower, we can continue our hike on a narrow asphalt road beginning at the meadow towards north. After some minutes we reach the hairpin bend of the road, but we go on straight on a well trodden dirt road.

The Festetics Lookout Tower stands on the top of Varsás Hill

The blue strip and in the hairpin bend (Letérés a Nagy-mező felé)joined red strip marks lead us on the dirt road beside a long and narrow grassy meadow. At the other end of the field the way of the blue strip and red strip signs branch into two different directions, the blue strip sign go left. Our dirt road begins to climb slowly in the Pórak-háti-völgy (Valley of Pórak-hát), and we reach a narrow asphalt road on the ridge of hills after a three quarters hour long walk among forest patches and clear-cuts (Szék-tető, rátérés az aszfaltútra).

The hills of the Keszthelyi-hegység taken from the lookout tower. The Blue Trail leads in the valley beside the meadow.

We turn onto the worn asphalt strip leading on the ridge and walk on it in northeastern directions. We leave it after a ten minutes long hike, and turn left, onto a dirt road again. This road follows the top of the wide ridge, later we turn right onto wheel tracks and descend into a narrow valley. As we get to the bottom of the valley, we walk some hundred steps there, leave the forest and finally we turn left at the edge of cultivated fields. This path reaches a gravel road after some hundred steps, we turn onto it and get to the small Vállus village after a five minutes long walk. We can find the metal box of the Blue Trail's stamp on the wall of the former grocery of the village after the church on the left side of the steep sloping road (Vállus, pecsételőhely).

We leave the asphalt road of the village at the bus station, and turn right onto a dirt road. The climb begins beside cultivated fields, after a while we get to the forest, and continue the walk among the trees. The dirt road climbs softly in the side of the Barbacs-hegy (Barbacs Hill), later the upward slope finishes and the road descends until the first weekend houses and vineyards.

The Kő orra Hill. We will climb onto its shoulder.

We turn left here onto the first dirt road, which leads at the edge of the gardens and gets to an asphalt road. We cross it, and continue our hike among vineyards. We have to keep our northeastern direction among the gardens towards a far group of trees, which stand on the edge of a small plateau in the hillside. We reach them after a hard climb in the hillside of the Kő orra (Kő orra Hill). If we cross the patch of trees on a narrow path, a beautiful panorama will open from the other side of them (Kilátópont a Kő orrán)!

View from the Kő orra Hill towards the extinct volcanoes of Basin of Tapolca

The Tapolcai-medence (Basin of Tapoca) lies in front of us at the foot of the hills and we can see almost every extinct volcanoes of the basin from this place! The hills of Szigliget stand on the right, we can see the ruins of the fortress with a good binocular on the top of one of them. Left from them stands the Badacsony, it is most well known mountain among them. Left from the Badacsony we can see the Szent György-hegy (Szent György Mountain), its shape is very similar to the Badacsony, a lot of people mix them! Unfortunately the Gulács stands behind the Szent György-hegy, so we can’t see it! Finally left in the far we can notice the Csobánc, which is the smallest among the volcanoes. Later we will climb almost all of them!

If we walk on, our way climbs softly in the side of the Kő orra, but we will stay in the side of the hill and don’t climb it. After the last vineyards the wheel tracks will finish, only a small path goes on. After a while the path turns right and begins to descend steeply through a patch of forest. After some minutes long walk we reach the gardens and vineyards again. We pass the Máté-kút (Máté Spring) and the resting benches beside it, and descend farther towards Lesenceistvánd village. The first stamping place is the pub of the village, we can find it at the junction of roads in the centre of the settlement behind the grocery (Lesenceistvánd, pecsételőhely). Another stamping place is the Fatehén büfé (Wooden Cow Buffet :-)) at the yard of a house (address: 97 Kossuth utca, Lesenceistvánd). The box of the stamp is equipped on the wall of the buffet beside the bar.

The Csobánc Mountain stands behind the houses of Tapolca

A long-long walk is waiting for us on asphalt roads here! First we hike one kilometer until the neighbour village named Lesencetomaj, here we turn left, cross the busy main road number 84 (84-es út keresztezése) and hike further 1.5 kilometers till the main road leading towards Tapolca. We turn onto it, and after an hour long walk, after the crossing of the railway (Tapolca, vasúti átjáró) we reach the town beside the old buildings of military barracks. We turn right at a roudabout onto the bypass road leading at the edge of the town, and reach the railway station after a quarter hour long walk (Tapolca, letérés a vasútállomáshoz). We can stamp into our booklets at the Lokomotiv Pub and Restaurant in front of the railway station. The box of the stamp is equipped onto a wooden post at the terrace of the restaurant.


Fifth section: from Tapolca railway station until Badacsonytördemic railway station

The Water Mill Restaurant stands at the coast of the Mill Lake

After the stamping we continue the hike on the route of the Blue Trail, go through the pedestrian underpass, cross the park in front of the station, turn onto the Dózsa György utca (Dózsa György Street) and later onto the wide and busy Deák Ferenc utca (Deák Ferenc Street). This road goes into the Fő tér (Main Square), which is only a wider part of the Deák Ferenc Street. The houses of the square are newly renovated, it is worth to stop and watch them. Here stands (or rather sit) the statue named Kis királylány (Little Princess) by László Marton. There is a house with an arcade on the right side of the square, we go through the arcade as we follow the blue strip marks, and reach the small Malom-tó (Mill Lake) on a promenade. The lake lies in a park, there is a restaurant with a terrace in the old building of the water mill. A small creek starts from the lake, the Tapolca-patak (Tapolca Creek) flows into the Balaton. Close to the lake, behind the watermill stand the ruins of the former castle of the town. It was destroyed in the Turk Age and a school was built above the remains. Now you can find only the ground of some towers and walls of it.

On the promanade beside the Tapolca Creek

Another beautiful sight of Tapolca is the Tavasbarlang (Lake Cave). It is accessible from the Fő tér with a five minutes long walk on the route of the blue cave marks. The nearly 300 meter long cave system, this unique attraction, is situated in the heart of the town. It was opened to the public in 1912 after ten years of its discovery. Small boats can be hired to explore the cave system.

Merely 15–20 m below the town a 5 km long cave system criss-crosses the Miocene limestone layers. This includes the 3.3 km long Lake Cave, which is mostly filled with karst water. The cave was discovered in 1903 during well digging. Thanks to the explorations even round boat trips were made possible from 1937. Because of its special origin and unique formations, it was designated already in 1942, and placed under strict protection in 1982. The mixture of the cold karst water flowing here and the thermal water upsurging from the deep dissolves limestone. Initially narrow passages, then smaller and larger niches were formed. During a very long time they widened into spacious chambers and passages. Source of the text: The official website of the Lake Cave.

In front of us stands the Szent György-hegy

After the sightseeing we continue or hike along the Blue Trail. The blue strip marks lead us on the promenade beside the Tapolca Creek and later on the Martinovits Ignác utca (Martinovits Ignác Street) and Vastagh János utca (Vastagh János Street). We reach slowly the border of Tapolca, cross the bypass road and continue our hike on a small, but busy asphalt road exactly towards the Szent György-hegy. After a half an hour long walk we reach the big vineyards at the foot of the mountain and the place, where the Blue Trail leaves the busy asphalt strip (Letérés a Szent György-hegy felé). We turn right here and continue the hike on a narrow and worn asphalt road among the long rows of the vineyard. After some minutes we turn right here and the climb begins in the mountainside.

As we climb higher, we left the big vine growing area and walk among the smaller gardens, vineyards and wine cellars. The asphalt surface of the road finishes, a dirt road, later only grassy wheel tracks climb further in the mountainside. After a while we notice the well known “Basalt Orgels” of the Szent György-hegy in front of us. These high basalt columns were formed after the eruption of the mountain, when the lava got consolidated in the mountainside. Later the rising of the road finishes, but we turn right at the last house, pass it and enter the forest on a narrow path. Finally we reach the resting place beside the closed tourist hostel on big basalt stairs. We can find the stamp of the Blue Trail in a window of the house behind the shutter (Szent György-hegyi turistaház).

The Basalt Orgel taken from the plateau of the Szent György-hegy

If we walk on after a short rest, our path get steeper and steeper, later we reach the stairs leading towards the flat top of the mountain among the basalt columns. At the end of the wooden and basalt stairs we reach the forest at the rim of the almost flat top of the Szent György-hegy. Two smaller paths branch out from the well trodden footpath, it is worth walking until their ends, because they lead onto the top of the Basalt Orgels. A nice panorama opens from the end of the paths onto the basalt columns and the environment of the mountain.

The Badacsony taken from the Szent György-hegy

We will reach the clearing with a resting shelter on the path of the Blue Trail soon (Szent György-hegy, letérés a hegytető felé), here the blue strip marked path turns left and begin to descend from the mountain. But this place is not the real top of the mountain, we can reach it on the path which is marked with blue triangle marks! From the top of Szent György-hegy opens a really beautiful panorama onto its environs and the Balaton Lake, it is worth visiting it! If we go back to the junction of the paths and turn onto the Blue Trail, we will begin the descend from the mountain and reaches the vineyards and wine cellars in the southern mountainside soon. The dirt road descends only very mildly as we walk around in the mountainside. We take almost a quarter circle around the Szent György-hegy, later we turn down from this well trodden dirt road and begin to slope on a path. After some minutes we reach another dirt road, turn left onto it and begin to walk in the opposite direction, than some minutes ago!

The building of the Tarányi pince

Later the road turns right, but we keep the heading on a path. After some minutes we get to the Oroszlánfejű-kút (Oroszlánfejű Spring, it means Lionheaded Spring). We can fill up our bottles from the cool and clear water of the spring before we continue our hike. An asphalt road begins at the spring, we reach the baroque building of Tarányi pince (Wine cellar named Tarányi) and the Lengyel kápolna (Lengyel Chapel) on it.

We continue the hike on the asphalt road, and reach slowly the foot of the mountain. The road turns west, but after a while we leave it and cross a big vineyard along a gappy acacia strip. Later the forest strip finishes, we walk farther on a sandy dirt road, and reach the asphalt access road of Hegymagas village on it. We turn onto the asphalt strip and after a 1.5 kilometer long walk get to the busy main road number 71. We cross it and continue our walk on the bicycle lane beside it (Rátérés a kerékpárútra). After a one kilometer long walk we reach the access road of Szigliget village. We turn onto it, and later, where the asphalt road bends right, we go straight on a steeply rising stony road. Some minutes later we reach a car park in the hillside.

The view of Szent György-hegy from the ruins of Castle of Szigliget

The Blue Trail goes farther on this road, but here is the starting point of a promenade, which climbs to the ruins of the fortress of Szigliget (Szigliget, letérés a pecsételőponthoz). We can obtain the stamp of the Blue Trail at the small house of the ticket office standing beside this promenade at the ruined gate of the fortress. The small box of the stamp is located on the wall of the ticket office. Another stamp is in the wine shop named “In vino veritas” wine shop at the beginning of the promenade.

The ruins are high above us, but it is worth climbing till the remains, visit them and admire the beautiful panorama, which opens from the walls. This fortress, similar to other ones in Hungary, was built after the Tartar invasion in the middle of the 13th century and was destroyed by the Turkey troops in the 16th century.

The Badacsony Mountain

If we turn back onto the route of the Blue Trail, we have a three kilometres long walk until the railway station of Badacsonytördemic village, but we can take a short detour meanwhile to the ruins of an 800 years old church. It is accessible by a two minutes long walk from the “Y” junction of asphalt roads in southeastern direction. We leave the village, the road goes a while at the foot of the Antal-hegy (Antal Hill), later at a junction we turn east, cross the wide and deep trench of Eger-víz, after a long and straight section the main road 71 again, and get to the railway. We turn left at the railway barrier and get to the railway station beside the rails after some steps. The stamp of the Blue Trail is located in its metal box at the ticket office of the station (Badacsonytördemic, letérés a vasútállomáshoz).


Sixth section: from Badacsonytördemic railway station until Nagyvázsony

A glimpse towards the basalt rocks of Badacsony from the vineyards

After the stamping procedure we can hike farther. We walk some steps on that road, where we arrived to Badacsonytördemic, and turn right, onto the Zöldfa utca (Zöldfa Street). We reach the main road of the village on it. We turn right here, but after fifty steps turn left and begin the climb onto the Badacsony Mountain. It is perhaps the most well known extinct volcano of the Tapolca Basin, it stands at the coast of Balaton with its symmetrical frustum of cone shape.

We begin the ascend on the Rodostó utca (Rodostó Street) among gardens, later we continue it on the steeper and narrower Újhegy út (Újhegy Road). We leave the last dwelling houses and the road reaches the wine cellars and vineyards in the mountainside. The meandering road is covered with asphalt, but it is very narrow, if we meet with a car, we have to step to the fences of the gardens to give way. The road climbs higher and higher in the mountainside, slowly it reaches the last gardens and vineyards at the foot of the rocks. After a while we get to the beginning of the Bujdosók lépcsője (Stairs of Exiles).

Steep climb on the Bujdosók lépcsője

The name of the stairs refers to Prince Rákóczi Ferenc, who led the revolution against the Austrian Empire between 1703 and 1711. The revolution was defeated and the prince with his mates had to go in exile into the Turkey village Tekirdag (its Hungarian name is Rodostó), at the coast of the Marble Sea.

The stairway is very long, and it has two sections. The first part leads to the former Rodostó tourist hostel, which is closed this time, and it contains 125 basalt stairs. The Blue Trail get around the fence of the former tourist hostel and the stair continues on the other side of the yard. The second part is the longer one, it has 464 stairs! We reach the wide plateau of the Badacsony after a long and exhausting climb among trees and basalt rocks! There is a resting place on the edge of the plateau and a path signed with blue triangle marks leads to a small lookout point from there. The Szent György-hegy and Badacsonytördemic village is visible from that place.

The Ranolder Cross stands on the rim of the Badacsony

The path of the Blue Trail meanders on the edge of the mountain and we reach the Ranolder kereszt (Ranolder Cross) after some minutes long walk. There are resting benches and desks on the clearing behind the high stone cross, but a beautiful view opens from the lookout terrace beneath the foot of the cross! We can see the western basin of the Balaton from this point with the villages and towns. The stone cross was built in 1857, its name refers to the bishop, who erected it here, at the edge of the plateau.

The view of Balaton Lake and the Hills of Szigliget from the cross

The path of the Blue Trail continues at the edge of the plateau, and after some minutes we reach another lookout terrace. From this place we can see rather the middle basin of Balaton. The path leaves the edge of the mountain here, and goes on through the plateau. We walk along a cut-line in the forest, after a while turn right and take a small descending detour to the lookout point named Hertelendy emlék, where we have a nice view towards the eastern part of Balaton. We lose some level here, but later we climb back onto the plateau, continue the walk in the cut-line again and reach after a quarter hour the highest point of the Badacsony, where the wooden Kisfaludy lookout tower stands (Badacsony, Kisfaludy kilátó). The nice wooden tower was inaugurated in year 2013, which is built intsead of the old, worn tower. It is worth climbing it, because a beautiful round panorama opens from its top level onto the environs of Badacsony Mountain!

After the lookout tower the path of the Blue Trail leaves the plateau and descends steeply in the deep and narrow valley of the Kőkapu to the vineyards of the northern mountainside. At the first houses appears the regular cone shape of the Gulács Mountain in front of us, and if we turn back, we can see the basalt rocks of the Kőkapu (Kőkapu means Stone Gate). Some minutes later a nice view opens towards the Szent György-hegy from the meadow of Köbölkút.

The view of the Gulács Mountain from the northern side of Badacsony

Our dirt road descend among vineyards into the wide valley between the Badacsony and Gulács mountains, pass by the resting benches and desks at the Köbölkút (Köböl Well), later we cross the main road in the col (Országút keresztezés). Now we begin the climb in the side of the Gulács. After the last houses and gardens we enter the forest and climb steeply onto the forest covered shoulder of the mountain. The path of the Blue Trail doesn’t visit the top of the mountain, it begins to descend here, but we can climb the top of Gulács on a very steeply climbing path, which is signed with blue triangle marks (Gulács, kék háromszög jelzés a hegytetőre). The blue strip marked path reaches after a while a narrow asphalt road leading towards Káptalantóti village. We turn onto it, and get to the centre of the village after a half an hour, while we have a permanent nice view towards the Csobánc Mountain.

We can stamp with the Blue Trail’s stamp in the Horváth kert pub at the centre of the village (Káptalantóti, Horváth kert)), and leave the settlement on the asphalt road. This road leads till the main road, where we turn right and walk on this road about 3-400 steps. We turn left at the junction of the next dirt road towards the last extinct volcano of the Basin of Tapolca: towards the Csobánc. The Blue Trail crosses a weedy meadow, later we reach the vineyards of the hillside on the dirt road. We can see the ruins of the fortress very well from this road, they stand on the southern edge of the plateau of the mountain.

The Csobánc taken from the vineyards

The dirt road climbs higher and higher in the mountainside, and after a while we reach a junction of dirt roads. The blue strip marks turn left and continue the climb, the blue cross marks go on straight and begin to descend back into the valley (Csobánc, kék rom jelzés a hegytetőre). After the junction we pass the small clearing of the Vár-kút (Vár Well), later we leave the dirt road and turn right onto a path. We pass the last weekend house, step into the forest and a very hard climb begins here until the plateau! We reach the flat top after a ten minutes long exhausting climb. The path take a big half circle at the edge of the plateau of the mountain in counterclockwise, during the walk we can admire in the beautiful panorama of the Tapolca Basin and the extinct volcanoes. We get to the ruins after a short walk.

Panorama from the top of the Csobánc

The Csobánc is the last volcano, which is visited by the path of the Blue Trail, it is worth taking a short rest at the ruined fortress and admire the beautiful panorama of the Tapolca Basin! The renovation of the walls began some years ago, the shape of the old fortress becomes more and more complete. If we continue the hike along the path of the Blue Trail, we will descend on the western side of the mountain on the ancient access road of the castle. The road sinks meanderingly in the bare mountainside, later we reach the vineyards and weekend houses again. We walk around the mountain in its northerns side, and get to a narrow, worn asphalt road after a quarter an hour.

We turn onto it, take about 500 steps in south-eastern direction, after that we turn left and leave it on wheel tracks. A newer climb begins here, first among vineyards, later we reach the forest. We climb further on a very neglected, weedy wheel track among the trees and cross the ridge of the next hill (A Láz-tető nyerge). On the other side we descend among abandoned and neglected farms until a well trodden dirt road, where we turn left. We hike around a valley among vineyards, and enter the forest on a dirt road on the other side. This road descends into a narrow valley and we reach the border of Mindszentkálla village on it (Mindszentkálla). We get to the small plain of the Káli-medence (Basin of Kál) here.

The blue strip marks turn onto the narrow asphalt road, which goes towards Szentbékkálla village. The settlement is not far, we can see the houses and the tower of the church at the finish of the straight road. We go some minutes on this asphalt strip, and turn left onto a dirt road at the direction board of a horse riding club. The dirt road runs along the edge of a big, grassy field and before the building of the homestead we turn right, onto other wheel tracks. We walk until the north-western corner of the field, where we turn right and walk along the on its other side. We reach the foot of the hill of the Kőtenger (Stone Sea) on this road (Szentbékkállai Kőtenger).

The rocks of Kőtenger

The rocks of the Stone Sea were formed from the sand of an ancient sea, whose sandy coast was located here. The unusual rock formations and stone cavities evolved following the post-volcanic era when thermal springs erupted in the area, and the hot water hardened and cemented the local white sand into a stone mass. Later, in the Middle Ages people sculpted mill stones from the rocks, but a little part of them left here for the posterity.

The path of the Blue Trail goes along the ridge of the long hill among the rocks, later it descends on its other side. We reach the border of Szentbékkálla on a dirt road and continue our way on the Toldi utca, but we leave the village soon on a dirt road. Later we turn onto a path and visit the remains of an old mansion at the hillside. It was the mansion of the bishop of Veszprém still in the Middle Ages. We turn back into the village from the ruins and get to the centre of the settlement soon. We can stamp into our booklets at the pub. The stamp is located in its steel box on the terrace of the pub on the wheel well (Szentbékkálla, pecsételőpont).

View from the ruined church of Töttöskál

We continue the hike on the Kossuth Lajos utca (Kossuth Lajos Street), later we turn left and leave the village in western direction. The Fekete-hegy (Fekete Hill) stands exactly in front of us with a lookout tower on its top. At the big bend of the asphalt road we go farther on a dirt road until a “T” junction of dirt roads. The blue strip marks of the Blue Trail turn left here, but if we follow the blue ruin marks leading right, we will reach in five minutes the ruins of the church of the former Töttöskál village in the hillside (Töttöskáli templomrom). The village was destroyed in the Turkey Ages, but the church was intact till the end of the 18th century. A nice panorama opens toward the Basin of Kál and the far volcanoes of the Basin of Tapolca from this place.

We continue the hike along the Blue Trail among vineyards and garden on a well trodden dirt road, and in the next junction turn right onto wheel tracks. These tracks turn left at a stone cross, but we walk straight on a narrow footpath and cross a patch of forest. After a while we leave the trees and reach a small asphalt road at the end of the narrow footpath among vineyards and gardens. The cave of the Öreg-hegyi-kút (Spring of Öreg-hegy) is located exactly on the other side of the asphalt strip. The spring gives always cool and clear water. We turn onto this road and go farther on the same level in the hillside. After 3-400 steps we turn right in a junction, onto a steep climbing road towards the top of hill. Later it turns right and we go exactly in the opposite direction, than some minutes ago, but with some floors higher! The quality of this road becomes worse and worse, after some minutes it will be only a wheel track, later a grassy path. It finishes at the gate of the last yard, here we turn left, and continue the climb on a stony footpath. This path ascends continuously, later we leave it, turn right and cross the forest on another path. We reach the lookout tower named Eötvös Károly after a 20 minutes long walk in the forest (Fekete-hegy, Eötvös kilátó).

Panorama from the lookout tower

A beautiful panorama opens from the top terrace of the lookout tower towards the Basin of Kál and the far extinct volcanoes of Basin of Tapolca. We can see even the Balaton among the hills! It is worth resting some minutes in the tower and admire the panorama! If we walk on, the path of the Blue Trail meanders a while on the edge of the Fekete-hegy among the trees. After a while, at the junction of marked trails, where the blue triangle marked path begin to sink in the hillside, the blue strip marked path turn left to cross the flat top of the Fekete Hill. We have to follow this meandering, hardly visible path through the fields among trees and small forest patches, finally about one km later we turn right, onto another wheel tracks. We reach the forest again, our road descends in a gorge from the plateau. After a while we turn left, climb out from the shallow valley and continue the walk on different paths and dirt roads in the hillside among forest paths, vineyards and gardens. We have to watch the blue strip signs strongly, because the route of the Blue Trail changes its direction often! We will reach the border of Balatonhenye village after a half an hour long walk.

We find the box of the Blue Trail's stamp in the centre of the settlement, in the back garden of the pub, on the wall of the house (Balatonhenye, pecsételőpont). After the stamping procedure we continue the walk along the Kossuth utca (Kossuth Street) until the Calvinist church of the village, where we turn left and climb a hill. After the last houses we reach a junction of wheel tracks in the bare, stony hillside, we have to follow those wheel tracks, which climb into north-eastern direction through the wide fields. The marks are painted very rarely, only on those places, where the tracks crosses forest patches or passes lonely trees. We reach slowly the flat plateau, pass by a wide cultivated area and enter the forest.

The building of the forest school

Our dirt road crosses the forest and we reach a stony road after a kilometer long walk (Rátérés a murvás erdei útra). We turn onto this road, and after a 40 minutes long walk we get to the buildings of the forester’s lodge and the forest school (Csicsói erdészház, pecsételőpont). Generally the forest schools are cheep accommodations in the nature, where school classes can spend some days to get to know the flora and fauna of the forest. Almost every pupil of primary schools can spend a short vacation in similar places. The stamp of the Blue Trail is located on wooden post in front of the buildings, at the gate of the school.

Later we walk on and reach the end of this gravel road after a half an hour. We turn right onto the narrow asphalt road, and walk about 4-500 steps on it (Vigántpetendi országút). We have to watch the left side of the road, because we have to turn onto a narrow path, which leads back into the thick forest! If we find it, we have to follow this narrow path, which descend mildly through the forest until the ruins of the monastery of Tálod. Only one wall stands alone in the forest, it shows the place, where the building was standing until the Turkey Ages, when it was destroyed. We find the Kinizsi-forrás (Kinizsi Spring) and the resting place beside the ruins.

The ruins of the destroyed monastery

After the spring we reach the edge of the forest, and continue our hike on grassy wheel tracks through the fields beside it. We pass the ruins of the Szent Ilona kápolna (St. Helen's Chapel) and after a half an hour long walk the tracks climb the bare hill of Szent Mihály-hegy (Szent Mihály Hill). The wheel tracks lead parallel with the border of the forest in 50 steps distance, and we have to find that narrow path, which leads into the forest. After a ten minutes long walk among the trees we reaches an old stone well in the forest. This is the 500 years old well of the former monastery named Szent Mihály. The ruins of the monastery stand in the forest among the trees on a small clearing (Szent Mihály kolostorrom). It was one of the biggest cloisters in Hungary in the 16th century, when it was destroyed by the landlords on the district, that the Turkey troops could not use it as fortress.

The ruined castle of Nagyvázsony

After the monastery we reach Nagyvázsony village after some minutes long walk and notice the ruins of the fortress. We find the stamp of the Blue Trail at the small building of the ticket office in its box equipped on the wall (Nagyvázsony, várpénztár). If the office is closed, we find another stamp in the Kinizsi Pub (address: 84 Kinizsi utca, Nagyvázsony). We stamp into our Blue Trail booklet, and finish our long hike through the Balaton-felvidék Region here.










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